TODAYS TREAT
POST DATE: Oct 20, 2016

What can you do to stop a dog escape artist?

 

 

I’m not quite sure what the dog referred to is escaping from, but assuming its the kind of dog that bolts out the front door as people enter or sneaks through a gate as you walk in, the problem can be easily fixed with training. In my experience dogs that try to run away are suffering from a lack of exercise, freedom and training. Every dog needs a safe space to run off leash and “be a dog.” If you do not have a fenced yard, try finding a dog park, tennis court, or other fenced space in which to exercise your dog. All dogs need to run for exercise and mental health.

 

Once a dog has had an opportunity to experience freedom and exercise you can begin to train him not to bolt through a door or gate. Every time you go through a threshold and do not want your dog to come with you, give the command, “No dogs.” If the dog attempts to follow you push the gate or door towards the dog and repeat, “No dogs.” If your dog is persistent and manages to squeeze through, put him on a long leash or rope. As he bolts through the door, command “Come” and give a jerk on the leash. Praise the dog as he returns to you. Reposition the dog in the house or yard and begin the lesson of “No dogs” again.

 

As a general household rule, teach your puppy to wait in a sit as you exit through a doorway first. This can be accomplished with a buckle collar and leash. Reposition the puppy into a sitting position if he moves after being commanded to “stay.” Repeat “good” as the puppy sits. Do not repeat the “Stay” command.

 

 

Every dog should be taught to “come” immediately after bolting out a door way. To teach this, put your dog on a long leash (30-50 ft.) Open the front door and allow the dog to escape. As soon as the dog exits the house, command “Come.” If your dog does not immediately reverse direction and return, jerk the long line and repeat the “Come” command. Repeat this process until the dog learns to turn around and re-enter the house. The only way to teach a dog to come back when he runs away is to allow him to escape.  

POST DATE: Mar 10, 2016

 

 

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO WORKING WITH SHY DOGS

 

By Diane Bauman (2016)

 

If you have a shy dog it is usually because the dog was born with the potential to fear things, he was not socialized as a young dog and/or because of a traumatic event in his life. Discovering the cause of a dog's shyness does not help him gain confidence. Pitying or comforting a timid dog only makes the problem worse. Every shy dog needs a strong, calm, leader (you) to help him gain confidence.

 

Timid dogs should be exposed to many different situations, sounds, people, new dogs, other animals, and life in general. It is very important not to force these dogs to interact with new things. Do not ask your dog to take food from a stranger. Instruct strangers not to make eye contact with your dog and simply ignore his presence. You may hold a treat near a stranger (by his leg for example) and tell your dog, “friend. ” If the dog takes the reward from you near the stranger, praise. If your dog is too stressed to eat a treat, continue socializing him but do not expect him to be able to eat.

 

Whenever possible, socialize your dog with a confident dog at his side.

 

Never allow a shy dog to hide behind you. Simply reposition the dog (with the help of a collar and leash if necessary) in front of you and praise him.

 

In the home, make every effort to keep a timid dog with you and in the center of what is going on. This is best done on a collar and leash. Eventually, being in the midst of life becomes normal for even a shy dog. Limit this dog's crate time to only when it is absolutely necessary, as the crate makes the fear of the real world worse by providing a place to hide.

 

Teaching a dog basic obedience and/or tricks engages the brain, builds confidence and gives a shy dog something else to think about in place of his surroundings. Agility training is a wonderful way to instill confidence in a shy dog who learns to climb on things, jump over things and crawl into tight spaces (ie tunnels).

 

All timid, fearful dogs improve with patience, time and training. If the issue of fear is not addressed, it will undoubtedly get worse and often leads to biting (fear aggression.)

 

 

 

 

POST DATE: Mar 01, 2011

Students frequently ask me, "Is my dog ready to compete? How will I know when he is ready?"

To me, "showing a dog" means showing off what your dog can do. While all dogs are unpredictable, the handler should have a very good idea of the performance she can expect in a trial situation before mailing in an entry.

Training your dog in many different locations and attending practice "match shows" are a good indication of how you might expect your dog to behave under trial conditions.

In training, we always "proof" a dog to test his understanding of each exercise. This means making the task more difficult in practice than it will be in a show situation. If a dog understands and performs in the midst of multiple distractions in training then there is a good chance he will respond correctly with some distractions at a trial.

It is to your advantage to wait until your dog is completely trained before showing. If you feel your dog is prepared to trial, you will be less nervous when you enter a competition.

Remember, "there will be no wine until it's time." 

“Ras” gives a hug
  • Dogs
  • Agility
  • Obedience
  • Afghan Hounds
  • Diane's Training Philosophy
  • Obedience
  • Herding
  • About Diane
  • Afghan Hounds
  • Dogs
  • Agility
  • Afghan Hounds
  • Dogs
  • About Diane
  • Agility
  • Dogs
  • Dogs
  • Afghan Hounds
CLICK TO VIEW All photos are copyrighted. They may not be used or reproduced without permission from their respective owners. ADMIN LOGIN
© 2011 Diane Bauman.